New Geospatial Approaches to the Anthropological Sciences
edited by Robert L. Anemone and Glen C. Conroy
New Geospatial Approaches
                to the Anthropological Sciences

Chapter 9. Pastoralist Participation (PastPart). A Model of Mobility and Connectivity across the Inner Asian Mountain Corridor


MD Frachetti, CE Smith, and C Copp

Additional Chapter details here

Figures

Fig. 1. The geography of the Inner Asian study zone (in color) and the location of the main Silk Road cities across Asia.

Fig. 2. A detailed view of the seasonal highland/lowland division of the elevation range of interest. Highland "summer" zones are defined by 1500 to 4000 m above sea level, and lowland "winter" zones are defined from 750 to 1500 m above sea level. Select Silk Road cities are mapped for reference.

Fig. 3. Detail of a single iteration of random points plotted in the lowland elevation. In total, five thousand points were randomly generated (per run) in the lowland Region of Interest (ROI) across the entire study zone.

Fig. 4. (a) Detail of a vegetation cost-surface raster based on a reclassified NDVI.

Fig. 4. (b) Detail of a cost-distance raster calculated using random lowland points and vegetation.

Fig. 5. (a) Detail of a single iteration of flow-accumulation pathways generated by the PastPart model; (b) ten iterations of aggregate flow-accumulation pathways generated by the PastPart model; (c) five hundred iterations of aggregate flow-accumulation pathways generated by the PastPart model.

Fig. 6. The geographic correlation between select Silk Road sites and five hundred aggregated flow-accumulations of the PastPart model. Detailed subregional maps (a-c) illustrate non-zero flow vectors an their spatial proximity to Silk Road sites (not used in calculating flow accumulation).